Exploding Cyber Inevitable

You used to have to take a picture to make it last longer, but now...

yoyothericecorpse:

A lot of my friends and my family find my work cute and creepy the same time (which is kind of true and i find it funny) because I ve come to realise it myself too *haha* unfortunately i cant explain why. i dont really know, it was just kind of…slowly slowly…been developed this way. 

Anyway. I’d like to explain a little bit about these bunny-like characters.

First of all, they are not exactly bunnies or humans or anything. As I believe in spirits/ghosts (and have a massive obsession with fairytales/myths/lengends etc) I’d like to believe they are supernatural beings.

But as I always say believe what you want to believe AND It doesn’t have to be real.The idea behind the characters’ masks is just something personal, nothing too mysterious…its more about how I perceive things:) 

Again, Thank you all lovely people for liking my doodles I appreciate it a lot!

-Yo x

(via yoyothericecorpse)

...SPITE DA MAN

scholarshit:

image

Second Childhood… Tangled Webs
c. 2011 66x51 in Acrylic and oil stick on canvas

Tangled Webs is an observation on the complicated, multilayered, intersecting, sometimes liberating, sometimes tragic social scripts that inform contemporary Black American masculinity.

Images of Black male…

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Beccy Ridsdel’s “Surgically-Altered” Ceramics

by Amelia Taylor-HochbergPosted on March 25, 2014art
Beccy Ridsdel’s “surgically-altered” sculptures investigate craft in reverse. Everyday flatware is put under the knife, its outer layer peeled back to expose the innards: delicately patterned florals. The materiality of the dishes transforms from a rigid, fragile china to the supple, elastic skin of a surgeon’s patient, peeled back on the operating table. Treating the flatware as a cadaver study, Ridsdel is trying to understand the elemental structure of her craft, exposing her audience to the design and care inside a seemingly mundane ceramic object. The normal object becomes special; a specimen to study and understand.

(via artense)

WHEN I PICKED UP A CAMERA WITH A GROUP OF OTHER WOMEN, I’M NOT GOING TO SAY IT WAS A RADICAL ACT, BUT WE WERE CERTAINLY DOING IT IN SOME SORT OF DEFIANCE OF, OR REACTION TO, A MALE-DOMINATED WORLD OF PAINTING.

—LAURIE SIMMONS

[Interview Here]

DMA Unpacks Some of Its Newest Contemporary Treasures

One of the Dallas Museum of Art’s strongest collecting areas is art made after World War II, but because the DMA lacks permanent gallery space for those holdings, shows like Never Enough: Recent Acquisitions of Contemporary Art represent a relatively rare chance to dive into them. A+C’s Devon Britt-Darby caught up with DMA assistant curator Gabriel Ritter to ask what visitors can expect to see. [more]

whitneymuseum:

As the Whitney prepares for its historic move downtown, Flora Miller Biddle discusses the three generations of “Whitney Women”—her grandmother Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, who in 1914 founded the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village, and in 1930 the Whitney Museum of American Art; her mother Flora Whitney Miller, who served as the Museum’s President (1941–1966) and Chairman (1966–1974); and herself, who served as President (1977–1985) and is currently the Honorary Chairman of the Museum.

The Un-Private Collection:Jeff Koons and John Waters

Last night artist Jeff Koons and filmmaker/author/photographer John Waters discussed Koon’s innovative and ever-changing art making practice, which ranges from sculpture to painting to digital media. Like Waters, Koons’s art comments on the notion of “good taste,” as well as the decadence of capitalist culture, the innocence of childhood, and beauty’s eternal resonance. Waters will speak with Koons about the inspiration and ideas behind his iconic works such as Michael Jackson and Bubbles, Balloon Dog (Blue), and Girl with Dolphin and Monkey Triple Popeye (Seascape), all of which are part of the Broad’s collection. This program is presented as part of The Broad museum’s Un-Private Collection art talk series and is co-presented by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles’s ALOUD series.
Click here to watch the archived video…

The Un-Private Collection:
Jeff Koons and John Waters

Last night artist Jeff Koons and filmmaker/author/photographer John Waters discussed Koon’s innovative and ever-changing art making practice, which ranges from sculpture to painting to digital media. Like Waters, Koons’s art comments on the notion of “good taste,” as well as the decadence of capitalist culture, the innocence of childhood, and beauty’s eternal resonance. Waters will speak with Koons about the inspiration and ideas behind his iconic works such as Michael Jackson and Bubbles, Balloon Dog (Blue), and Girl with Dolphin and Monkey Triple Popeye (Seascape), all of which are part of the Broad’s collection. This program is presented as part of The Broad museum’s Un-Private Collection art talk series and is co-presented by the Library Foundation of Los Angeles’s ALOUD series.

Click here to watch the archived video…

Protest Action Erupts Inside Guggenheim Museum

Last night, over 40 protesters staged an intervention inside the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan during Saturday night’s pay-what-you-wish admission hours. Unfurling mylar banners, dropping leaflets, chanting words, handing out information to museum visitors, and drawing attention with the use of a baritone bugle, the group worked to highlight the labor conditions on Saadiyat Island in the United Arab Emirates, where Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, a franchise of New York’s Guggenheim, is being built.

[more: http://bit.ly/1k11KF7]

Jeff Goran’s “A Lighter or a Spoon”

Jeff Goran’s “A Lighter or a Spoon”

(via ickis77)

Basquiat’s Other Ex-Girlfriend Gives Glimpse Into The Artist’s Early Days

An upcoming auction at Christie’s features Basquiat’s work before he could afford to buy canvases. Back in the day, the then 19-year-old’s familiar motifs were plastered on sweatshirts, refrigerators, journals, walls, and any open space he could find. It wasn’t long before Basquiat’s apartment — a place he shared with his then-lover, Alexis Adler — became a sort of living installation, filled with the marks of his fiery imagination. Adler, an embryologist, lived with Basquiat during his struggling artist phase from 1979-1980, and has since lived with some of the artist’s earliest masterpieces for the past 35 years.

[more]

Update:  Basquiat Estate Sues Christie’s, Saying Some Works For Sale May Not Be Real [more via NY Times]

Put some trousers on: Lifelike stature of sleepwalking man freaks out students at all-female US college

  • Sleepwalker' by Tony Matelli was put up at the Wellesley College campus on Monday as part of an exhibition of the artist’s work at the college museum
  • By Wednesday, 270 students had signed a petition to have it taken down because it is a ‘source of apprehension and fear’
  • Some women said they thought it was a real semi-naked man
  • But the museum’s director said that good art is supposed to provoke

[more]