Exploding Cyber Inevitable

You used to have to take a picture to make it last longer, but now...

Hundreds of unseen Andy Warhol films to be digitized for public screenings

Approximately 500 movies made by pop art icon Andy Warhol, many of which have never been seen by the public, are in the process of being digitized. The project — a collaboration between The Warhol museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and two visual effects companies — will see almost 1,000 rolls of 16mm film converted to 2K resolution after being scanned frame by frame.

The painstaking process means the project is is set to take several years to complete, but some of Warhol’s unseen movies will be available for public consumption sooner than that. 15 digitized films will have their public premiere in October of this year as part of the Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films exhibition at New York’s Carnegie Music Hall.

In celebration of the museum’s 20th anniversary, The Warhol is proud to present the world premiere of Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films in partnership with The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) and UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance.  This new performance is comprised of 15 short Warhol films that have been recently digitized by MPC/Technicolor and have not yet been publically screened.

Five songwriter-composers, reflecting the generational trajectory and musical influence from post-Velvet Underground ‘70s through today have been selected to write and perform music live on stage: Tom Verlaine (Television), Martin Rev (Suicide), Dean Wareham (Galaxie 500, Luna), Eleanor Friedberger (the Fiery Furnaces), and Bradford Cox (Deerhunter, Atlas Sound).

The films chosen are a combination of portraits and actualités featuring Superstars and luminaries such as, John Giorno, Marcel Duchamp, Allen Ginsberg, Mario Montez, Marisol, Taylor Mead, Jack Smith, Mary Woronov, Edie Sedgwick, and Andy Warhol.

Nicole Coson

SPIRIT CAPTURES: GHOSTS OF HUMANLIKENESS

In her series Spirit Captures, London-based Filipino artist Nicole Coson explores, through the use of mono-prints, the significance applied to the classical portrait as a means of representation of its subject.  

The use of the singular mono-print technique emphasizes this paradox of the shared and collective perceptions, by initially being a direct product of the artist hand, ‘frozen’ in time and reproduced by the print-press – conceptually much like that of a photographic image being processed – originating in concrete reality, then obscured by simulation.

(Source: kuinexs)

After Dark at Tate Britain
This week, you can peek through the ‘eyes’ of four robots who will be roaming the darkened galleries in Tate Britain after all the visitors have left, controlled by anyone across the world who logs on through the website: afterdark.tate.org.uk
On Wednesday 13, Thursday 14 and Saturday 16 and Sunday 17 between 22.00 BST and 03.00 BST, you can log in to view the robots on their journey through the artworks and even remotely control their movements. If your kids (or you) can’t stay up that late, Friday 15 is the night for you, when the robots will be taking a turn about the galleries between 19.30 BST and 00.30 BST.
The first robot master was Colonel Chris Hadfield, retired commander of the International Space Station (you may remember him as the singing astronaut performing David Bowie’s Space Oddity), though he navigated the robots this time from the slightly more mundane location of his home in Toronto.
After Dark has been created by design studio The Workers: Tommaso Lanza, Ross Cairns and David Di Duca. It is the winning project of the IK Prize 2014, which, supported by the Porter Foundation, is a new annual prize presented by Tate which celebrates digital creativity and seeks to widen access to art through the application of digital technology.

After Dark at Tate Britain

This week, you can peek through the ‘eyes’ of four robots who will be roaming the darkened galleries in Tate Britain after all the visitors have left, controlled by anyone across the world who logs on through the website: afterdark.tate.org.uk

On Wednesday 13, Thursday 14 and Saturday 16 and Sunday 17 between 22.00 BST and 03.00 BST, you can log in to view the robots on their journey through the artworks and even remotely control their movements. If your kids (or you) can’t stay up that late, Friday 15 is the night for you, when the robots will be taking a turn about the galleries between 19.30 BST and 00.30 BST.

The first robot master was Colonel Chris Hadfield, retired commander of the International Space Station (you may remember him as the singing astronaut performing David Bowie’s Space Oddity), though he navigated the robots this time from the slightly more mundane location of his home in Toronto.

After Dark has been created by design studio The Workers: Tommaso Lanza, Ross Cairns and David Di Duca. It is the winning project of the IK Prize 2014, which, supported by the Porter Foundation, is a new annual prize presented by Tate which celebrates digital creativity and seeks to widen access to art through the application of digital technology.

kuinexs:

Dissolution #25
Photoretouching; solvents on photography, 22x28cm.

kuinexs:

Dissolution #25

Photoretouching; solvents on photography, 22x28cm.

artslant:

The Herbert Foundation’s first in a series of archive exhibitions offers an impressive, focused look at the early years of conceptual art »> http://bit.ly/1oiEN2t

artslant:

The Herbert Foundation’s first in a series of archive exhibitions offers an impressive, focused look at the early years of conceptual art »> http://bit.ly/1oiEN2t

Take An Electrifying Look Inside The World’s First Light Art Museum

As the world’s first and only museum completely dedicated to light art, The Centre for International Light Art is located in an unlikely building, roughly three hours outside of Berlin. In 2002, the city of Unna started thinking about how they could turn an old brewery into something special. Specifically, they wanted to create a spectacular space with all those dark, murky beer cellars.

For the first time, the Centre for International Light Art Unna, is launching the first annual International Light Art Award 2015, which will light up the life of a young artist each year.

tmvrtx:

TMVRTX 2K14
B∆R∆K_Ø8∆M∆

tmvrtx:

TMVRTX 2K14

B∆R∆K_Ø8∆M∆

nyartsmag:

Ron Mueck, Youth, 2009. Mixed media, 65 x 28 x 16 cm / 25 5/8 x 11 x 6 1/4 in

nyartsmag:

Ron Mueck, Youth, 2009. Mixed media, 65 x 28 x 16 cm / 25 5/8 x 11 x 6 1/4 in

tedkincaidstudio:

Ted KincaidLifeboat 613, 2014 Hand Varnished Pigment on Hahnemühle Rice Paper 110 gsm 16” Diameter Chine-collé mounted on Stonehenge Natural 24x22”

tedkincaidstudio:

Ted Kincaid
Lifeboat 613, 2014
Hand Varnished Pigment on Hahnemühle Rice Paper 110 gsm
16” Diameter Chine-collé mounted on Stonehenge Natural 24x22”